Seeing Red 10

Sano was just opening his mouth for the first of what he inexplicably wanted answered when Hajime interrupted preemptively. “If you ask me something, you have to answer a question too.”

“What?” The startled Sano obviously assumed Hajime meant this as an expression of return curiosity.

“Equal exchange.” In fact, Hajime only wanted to minimize the time he had to spend talking about himself and, with the threat of reciprocation, prevent Sano from asking anything obnoxiously personal.

“O…K…” Sano was still surprised, and seemed to be wondering whether this meant Hajime wanted to be friends or what. He was getting better at keeping his thoughts to himself, though, and remarkably quickly at that. Finally he said, “So what made you choose to be an exorcist? And just so you know, ‘It seemed interesting’ is not a real answer.”

“I’m afraid, though, that it’s still the truth.” Hajime gave Sano a moment to get good and angry at this, then continued. “What’s the next reason for anyone’s career choice, after money? Being an exorcist doesn’t pay enough for me to have any reason to do it other than that it’s interesting.”

“Fine,” Sano allowed, very frustrated, “but, I mean, why aren’t you doing something that pays more? Why aren’t you brainwashing people for the government or doing some non-magical job that, you know… pays more?”

“Exorcism seemed more interesting.”

Sano made an angry noise. “I’m about to throw this ghost at you if you don’t quit it.” It was his coffee he raised threateningly, however.

Hajime laughed. “You’re mostly wondering how I can survive on just an exorcist’s paycheck… Why is that such an area of concern for you?”

“I don’t have to tell you a damn thing until you answer my question first.” Sano’s jaw was set as the lowest part of an impressive scowl, and his movements had taken on an angry stalking quality that was amusing to see.

“And I don’t have to answer any of your questions,” Hajime pointed out. “Though, technically, I did. So it’s your turn. What’s your issue with money?”

“Can’t you just read my mind if you want to know?”

“I probably could. So what’s your issue with money?”

Through the midst of the bright angry aura that surrounded him by now, Sano suddenly laughed. “This is probably the stupidest conversation I’ve ever had.”

“It is stupid, but I would hesitate to assign a superlative when you’re involved.”

“You would what to what, now?”

“Your issues with money?” Hajime prompted.

Again Sano laughed, this time sounding somewhat defeated, though his aura was only fading slowly. “OK, fine. My ‘issues with money.'” He shrugged. “I don’t think I really have any. We never had a lot of money when I was growing up, but we weren’t what I’d call poor or anything… My parents saved so they could help me pay for college, and I didn’t get a lot of cool stuff… and we always had to ‘shop smart’ and shit like that, especially for food and clothes, so I never got to wear what I wanted, which you know what that does to you in high school?

“And my parents — especially my dad — were always lecturing me about how to manage money, like, every single time I got any; and I’ve been working since I was fifteen — do you know, if you work in a restaurant when you’re fifteen, you’re not allowed to go into the walk-in fridge? — and my parents made me save most of it and never get anything I wanted… but, like I said, it’s not like we were poor or anything.”

As Sano listed all these issues with money he didn’t think he really had, Hajime was getting an impression, from behind the words, of the value Sano’s parents had been attempting to instill in him: a rigid frugality totally foreign to his careless nature that therefore manifested now, rather than as any sort of prudence, as more of an undiscriminating miserliness with occasional outbursts of extravagance. It was a good thing, after such mismanagement, they were helping him with his tuition.

“What are you grinning about?” Sano demanded suddenly.

“Nothing. Go on.”

Though Sano had originally been annoyed at being maneuvered into giving information first, and was currently annoyed at the implication that Hajime found what he had to say funny, he was also not unhappy to be complaining about his parents and this financial business. “My dad won’t leave me alone about money, ever. It’s gotten so I barely even want to talk to him, because every time I do I know there’s a million questions coming that I don’t really want to answer; and it kinda sucks not wanting to talk to your own dad just because of something like that, but, seriously, he needs to lay off!

“I mean, I’m twenty, for god’s sake, and I have my own apartment, even if it is kinda shit. And, yeah, they’re helping me pay for college, but does that really mean I have to do the classes they want me to take? I have to get my general ed out of the way no matter what I do, so it’s not like I absolutely have to decide right away, but my dad won’t stop getting on my case about choosing a major. He wants me to get some kind of business degree — you know, so I can make plenty of money — but I still don’t know if that’s what I want.”

“That’s what I have,” Hajime offered neutrally.

You have a degree in making money, and you’re still an exorcist?” As Hajime drew breath to answer, Sano added quickly, almost in a snarl, “Don’t you fucking dare say it seemed interesting.”

Hajime, who had been about to (had felt he simply couldn’t help it), instead restrained his grin at how much fun messing with Sano was proving and said seriously, “Yes. My magical talents woke up while I was attending college here in the States, and after I’d graduated and gone back to Japan I spent a couple of years thinking that a career in magic would be much more interesting than the family business, where I was expected to stay forever. But in Japan it’s almost impossible to make money as an exorcist if you don’t do things in approved Shinto style.”

Sano gave a Why am I not surprised? laugh, and Hajime smiled a little as he continued. “When one of my grandparents left me a decent inheritance, I moved back here and took up exorcism as a career.”

Despite how little information Hajime had actually given, Sano seemed extremely interested. Without even looking at the trash can they were passing, he discarded the coffee cup he’d by now emptied.

“Let’s cross here and head back,” Hajime suggested, gesturing at the street. Sano complied, still giving him an expectant look all the way along the crosswalk as if Hajime might have forgotten he was in the middle of a story of sorts. Actually, his evident fascination seemed strange; Hajime’s brief narrative certainly wasn’t any more interesting than Sano’s talk of his parents’ financial eccentricities.

“Of course I’ve invested since then, to make sure I always have enough to live on when no one happens to need an exorcist.” With a shrug to indicate just how mediocre he found all of this, Hajime finished, “That’s all there is to it.”

Clearly impressed, Sano said, “So you didn’t just get lucky getting some money from a relative…” He’d obviously been planning on making fun of Hajime for this (to the extent he was capable), but had been forestalled by further information. “You had something in mind and you went for it as soon as you could, and then you made sure you could keep doing it. Damn.” He didn’t even seem to be trying to conceal the fact that he found this simultaneously a little inspiring and a little unsettling.

Hajime too was just a trifle unsettled; he wasn’t used to inspiring people, and he thought Sano was assigning inordinate weight to insignificant things. So he sought quickly for a reply that would bring their interaction back to a more appropriate level. “It doesn’t mean you need to lean forward and gape at me like that… you look like an orangutan.”

After the predictable (and predicted) reaction from Sano, the latter fumed for a bit and then, as far as Hajime could tell, returned to wondering at Hajime’s apparent equanimity in response to his anger. He was still reading significance into unimportant things, but there was really nothing to be done about that.

The car system announced an incoming call not long after they’d started back from the coffee shop toward Forest of Four, and Hajime answered immediately.

“Didn’t I mention that my client is being haunted?” At this greeting, at his side, Sano’s brows went up over a skeptical smile; he obviously couldn’t tell that this type of rudeness and accusation was par for the course of these conversations, and assumed, therefore, that those involved must be more antagonistic toward each other than they actually were. Just to add to the effect, Hajime added, “Do you think I have all day?”

“You know I don’t really give a shit about your clients,” was the retort, sounding half lazy and half harried. “Ain’t my clients. And you better have all day, because there’s no way I’m getting this shit done right now. I’ve got other shit to do, since, unlike some bullying assholes I know, I have a real job.”

“When do you estimate you’ll have the information?”

“Tomorrow sometime… or not sooner than never if you’re a bitch about it.”

Hajime grinned. “Sooner than never sounds good. I’ll be waiting to hear from you.”

“Yeah, well, don’t hold your breath.”

“Thanks, Chou.”

As soon as he was convinced that the call had ended, Sano laughed. “Wow, that guy sounds like a complete moron!”

“Oh, really?” wondered Hajime mildly. “I was just thinking that he reminds me a little of you.”

“What??” It really was terribly entertaining how easily Sano’s buttons could be pushed. “You know, I was just thinking how rude it was that he called you a bitch, but now I think my mind’s changing all of a sudden!”

In a tone of agreement Hajime said, “It can’t weigh too much, so I guess it shifts easily.”

“What does the weight have to do with it?” Sano wondered suspiciously.

“Not too much on it.”

“I think that one was a stretch.” He sounded both amused and annoyed, though.

When they reached the Forest of Four parking lot, after only a few more, similar exchanges and nothing of any actual consequence between them, Sano vacated the car with some alacrity, his motions similar to those with which he’d been stalking along the street earlier. With a smirk, Hajime stood out his door and observed his companion over the roof. “I’ll call you as soon as I have information,” he offered.

With a stiffness born of annoyance, Sano nodded and turned away. He hadn’t been holding onto the ghost in the car, and it had yet to catch up; Hajime wondered a little whether its relatively rapid progress along the street in pursuit of Sano caused any of the inconveniences Sano sought to prevent elsewhere by conjuring it out of people’s paths. He supposed Sano couldn’t be held responsible for everything the ghost did, but it was beginning to be a little odd to see him without the glowing figure close by his side.

After Sano had taken a few steps away and Hajime had begun to move back in order to return to his seat, the young man stopped and turned. This time his stiffness seemed to have another basis entirely. In a voice that was half a grumble, “Thanks for the coffee,” he said.

Previous (Part 9) | Chapter Index | Next (Part 11)

4 Replies to “Seeing Red 10”

  1. Ugh, the first exchange already has me tearing my hair out! They *DO* eventually get to the stage of “good grief, why can’t we just knock boots already!” eventually, right? It goes beyond the “gee, his voice is kind of sexy” to the “ZOMG, his voice is THISCLOSE to unmanning me” (to cop a phrase from 50 Shades of Tripe)

    That said, it IS pretty deviously diabolically brilliant how Hajime eschews the asking of awkward, personal questions. THAT said, I wouldn’t have thought Sano would ask something intensely personal since he’s already feeling pretty indebted to Hajime, what with the latter helping the former for basically a song.

    “Can’t you just read my mind if you want to know?”

    “I probably could. So what’s your issue with money?”

    Allow me to interpret for you, Sano, since your anger seems to be interfering with your comprehension of buttsex subtext…Hajime is being the consummate gentleman in deference to your privacy. I shall tack on my opinion now: because Hajime wants to make sure he doesn’t screw up the path to sweet Sano loving later on.

    “You have a degree in making money, and you’re still an exorcist?”

    OHHHH, if ONLY Hajime had quipped, “I have a blackbelt in making money.” Which would explain how he can afford life on an exorcist’s wages XDDD Ohhh, yeah. Incidentally, I love the way Sano says “have a degree in making money” because it’s such an awesome way to look at college in general. Let’s just hope he’s not studying liberal arts XD

    Oh, I see. Hajime went to the Mitt Romney school of business.

    Alright, I will admit…I got lost after they crossed the street. At first, I thought you’d forgotten that they’d left the cafe (or that I was misremembering them as having left the cafe) but they were indeed walking during the entire exchange at the start of the chapter. The throwing away of the coffee cup threw me, but I’ve been away from America for so long, I’m not sure how people refer to a coffee cup and what, if any, distinctions may exist between the disposable kind and the not-disposable kind. But then they crossed the street and I felt confident they were on foot. Until Hajime answers his car phone thing…I wasn’t aware they had gotten INTO a car. The dialogue with the caller also was hard to follow, I wasn’t sure if it was the caller or Sano, but after the barbs exchanged after the call, I came to the stunning conclusion it was not Sano. But then, they are AT the car. I dunno, just in terms of placing the characters, I had a hard time following.

    BUT it was soopa doopa cute that Sano, begrudgingly, thanks Hajime for the coffee! He’s not a total punk. However, Hajime’s thought that Sano looks different without the ghost at his back makes me a bit sad (here we go, back to the “hurry up and shag” routine) as it makes me wonder if Hajiime is only interested–or primarily interested anyway–in Sano because of the ghost. Sure, he has fun bating the kid, but that’s just a little icing on the ghost cake. I’m sure it will evolve, but it was something that gave me pause.

    1. Of course they will eventually move beyond their current relationship… but I’m being particularly mean to them on this front in this world, and it’s going to be a while; sorry XD

      “I have a black belt in making money” made me laugh really hard. I actually thought “You have a degree in making money” was pretty funny when I wrote it, but a black belt is, like, a million times better XD XD

      I’ll take a look at the location transitions; thanks.

      Yeah, Sano’s definitely got an awkward little crush developing, but Hajime? You noticed that Hajime is still viewing Sano as accessory to the ghost to some extent; Sano noticed that too a couple of parts ago, and wasn’t terribly happy about it :D We’ll just have to see if that changes, eh?

      Thanks very much for your comments, as always!

  2. I’m cackling!! I know I said this in earlier comments (and a million times in other comments on your other stories, at that) but I just love the banter between them. Ahahahaha and Saito knows how easy it is to irritate Sano. I love it.

    AND YAAAASSS IT WAS CHO!!! I LOVE when these three get involved in something together and there’s tension between Sano and Cho. XD Saito saying they’re similar makes it all the better.

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